Tag: Books

Fundraising to save Burbank’s horror bookstore Dark Delicacies

Burbank’s amazing quarter-century institution Dark Delicacies is a horror book-, memoribilia- and clothing-store that is a community hub for genre creators, hosting a wonderful stream of events, signings, and even an annual chance to get your photo took with Krampus at a Christmas open-house. It’s also a potential casualty of the skyrocketing rents […]

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Don’t panic: Marie Kondo says you don’t have to throw away all of your books

Marie Kondo Responds to Twitter’s Backlash over Getting Rid of Books – HelloGiggles Don’t panic: Marie Kondo says you don’t have to throw away all of your books this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines.

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Hands-on: Elegant bucket list app ‘Soon’ launches on Android

In a world that bombards us with things to do, it can be tough to stay on top of everything we think is worth checking out. Movies we want to see, music to listen to, books to read, restaurants to try, and places to go, there’s just so much to do and almost no central […]

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Becoming a Being: Susan Sontag on Transcending the Bounds and Biases of History

“Time and reason are functions of each other,” Ursula K. Le Guin wrote in her philosophical novel exploring why honoring the continuity of past and future is the wellspring of moral action. The human animal is indeed a temporal creature, our experience of time at the center of our psychology. Locating ourselves is therefore largely […]

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Resistance Training

Since Donald Trump became president, the United States has seen over 20,000 street protests. While this number includes some pro-Trump rallies, most of the events voiced opposition to the administration. Between hundreds of Women’s Marches, the airport protests, the Tax March, the March for Science, the March for Truth, the […]

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Hermann Hesse on Solitude, the Value of Hardship, the Courage to Be Yourself, and How to Find Your Destiny

“No one can build you the bridge on which you, and only you, must cross the river of life,” the young Nietzsche wrote as he contemplated what it takes to find oneself. Somehow, this man of stark contradiction, cycling between nihilistic despondency and electric buoyancy along the rim of madness, has managed to inspire some […]

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Release: Jeremy Geddes – “Seven.Seventeen” Book

On January 15th (10am Melbourne time), Jeremy Geddes (interviewed) will be releasing a book he has been working on for quite some time. Seven.Seventeen captures the past decade of the Australian artist’s work and includes many gorgeous full page spreads of some of his most iconic images. Produced in an edition of 2000, the 22cm x 30cm and 200 page […]

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Hannu Rajaniemi’s Summerland: a midcentury spy thriller, with the afterlife

Hannu Rajaniemi is the Finnish-Scottish mathematician and science fiction writer whose debut, 2012’s Quantum Thief was widely celebrated; now, in Summerland, Rajaniemi delivers new kind of supernatural historical spy procedural, set in a 1938 where the afterlife has been discovered, colonized and militarized. Rachel White is a spy who is trying to help […]

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China has a very Orwellian reason for banning typing “1984” on social media, while allowing people to read Nineteen Eighty-Four

Chinese internet users can’t type the numbers “1984” into social media, but Chinese bookstores freely sell copies of Orwell’s novels, including Nineteen Eighty-Four, as well as other books whose titles are banned on social media. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, the inner Party members are allowed to read the literature that is banned for […]

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A celebration of Libro.fm: the indie, DRM-free Audible alternative that helps your local bookseller (with giveaway!)

(Neither Boing Boing nor I have received any compensation for this post: Libro.fm asked me to post this and I did so because I want to see them succeed -Cory) Libro.fm (previously) is an independent audiobook store that sells all the same audiobooks you can get on other platforms like Audible, Google Play, […]

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Alex Wagner’s epic mixed-race memoir Futureface makes the case for interrogating our family histories

To have roots in multiple places is to be divided, or so it can feel. Growing up in the diaspora, in a different place than your parents, means growing up with questions, whether they’re your own—What would it be like to communicate with your grandparents with no language barrier?—or everyone else’s—What are you? Political journalist […]

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“Dracula” Author Bram Stoker’s Extraordinary Love Letter to Walt Whitman

A quarter century before his now-classic epistolary novel Dracula catapulted Abraham “Bram” Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) into literary celebrity, the twenty-four-year-old aspiring author used the epistolary form for a masterpiece of a different order. Still months away from his first published short story, he composed a stunning letter of admiration and adoration to […]

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Neil Gaiman Reads Ursula K. Le Guin’s Ode to Timelessness to His 100-Year-Old Cousin

“Consciousness is tied to corporeality and temporality: I experience myself as existing with a body over time,” the German psychologist Marc Wittman wrote in his insightful investigation of the psychology of time. “Do you sometimes want to wake up to the singularity we once were?” poet Marie Howe asked in the opening lines of her […]

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The Operative

Imagine a pivotal moment in the history of the Supreme Court. A longtime partisan political operative is nominated and confirmed to the court. The party putting him forward is in the peculiar position of controlling all three branches of government, and yet is acutely concerned about future shifts in the […]

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Rebecca Solnit’s Lovely Letter to Children About How Books Solace, Empower, and Transform Us

Galileo considered reading our sole means of having superhuman powers. For Kafka, a book was “the axe for the frozen sea inside us”; for Anaïs Nin, the alarm to awaken us from the slumber of almost-living; for Gwendolyn Brooks, “meat and medicine and flame and flight and flower.” Since the invention of the printing press, […]

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Confidence Through Criticism: A Lesson in Self-Esteem from Walt Whitman

“Re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul,” Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) wrote in offering his timeless advice on living a vibrant and rewarding life in the preface to Leaves of Grass. When Whitman first published his masterpiece in 1855, […]

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