Tag: Books

WANT/NEED: A Little Women gift set that helps fund literacy programs, and more stuff you want to buy

WANT/NEED: A ‘Little Women’ Gift Set That Helps Fund Literacy Programs – HelloGiggles WANT/NEED: A Little Women gift set that helps fund literacy programs, and more stuff you want to buy

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Beasts of India: Stunning Illustrations of Indigenous Animals Depicted in Various Tribal Art Traditions

A vibrant menagerie at the nexus of nature and culture. By Maria Popova In his insightful inquiry into why we look at animals, John Berger lauded non-human creatures as “the objects of our ever-extending knowledge.” They have animated our earliest cave drawings and populated our finest poetry. As the science historians Lorraine Daston and Gregg […]

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We Grow Accustomed to the Dark: Emily Dickinson’s Stunning Ode to Resilience, Animated

A timeless serenade to finding light amid the “Evenings of the Brain.” By Maria Popova How do we survive the unsurvivable? What is that inextinguishable flame that goes on flickering in the bleak, dark chamber of our being when something of vital importance has been lost? “All your sorrows have been wasted on you if […]

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The Only Story in the World: John Steinbeck on Kindness, Good and Evil, the Wellspring of Good Writing

“All the goodness and the heroisms will rise up again, then be cut down again and rise up,” John Steinbeck (February 27, 1902–December 20, 1968) wrote as he contemplated good, evil, and the necessary contradiction of human nature at the peak of WWII. “It isn’t that the evil thing wins — it never will — […]

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Consider the Tree: Philosopher Martin Buber on the Discipline of Not Objectifying and the Difficult Art of Seeing Others as They Are, Not as They Are to Us

When Walt Whitman contemplated the wisdom of trees, he saw in them qualities “almost emotional, palpably artistic, heroic,” and found in their resolute being a counterpoint to the human charade of seeming. “When we have learned how to listen to trees,” Hermann Hesse rhapsodized in his lyrical love letter to our arboreal companions, “then the […]

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The Woman Who Smashed Codes: The Untold Story of Cryptography Pioneer Elizebeth Friedman

While computing pioneer Alan Turing was breaking Nazi communication in England, eleven thousand women, unbeknownst to their contemporaries and to most of us who constitute their posterity, were breaking enemy code in America — unsung heroines who helped defeat the Nazis and win WWII. Among them was American cryptography pioneer Elizebeth Friedman (August 26, 1892–October […]

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You Belong Here: An Illustrated Antidote to Our Existential Homelessness

Sweet consolation for the lifelong alienation that afflicts each of us at different times and in different measures. By Maria Popova There is hardly a more elemental human need than our need for belonging — in a place, in a heart, in ourselves. Perhaps this is why we are so susceptible to that particular kind […]

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A new, free edition Sarah Jeong’s “The Internet of Garbage”

Journalist Sarah Jeong (previously) was just appointed to the New York Times’s editorial board, prompting garbage people to dig through her twitter for old posts that could be made to seem offensive out of context in the hopes of getting her fired. But the Times stood by her and The Verge, her former […]

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The Difficult Art of Giving Space in Love: Rilke on Freedom, Togetherness, and the Secret to a Good Marriage

“Love one another but make not a bond of love: let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls,” the great Lebanese-American poet, philosopher, and painter counseled in what remains the finest advice on the secret to a loving and lasting relationship. Our paradoxical longing for intimacy and independence is a […]

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