Tag: Brain and Behavior

When Teen Depression Eases With Treatment, So Does Parent’s

New research shows that when a teen’s depression improves through treatment, so did depression experienced by the parent. “More young people today are reporting persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness and suicidal thoughts,” said Kelsey R. Howard, M.S., of Northwestern University, who presented the findings at the 2018 annual convention of the American Psychological Association. […]

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Psychology Around the Net: August 11, 2018

Gear up and get ready for the latest in mental health news, Psych Central readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers a disturbing new trend involving selfies and plastic surgery, why some mental health professionals believe shopping addiction should be recognized as a mental illness, how mindfulness might not be the best practice for […]

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Political and Social Differences Can Encourage Paranoid Thinking

Interacting with someone of a higher social status or opposing political beliefs may increase paranoid interpretations of the other person’s actions, according to a new UK study by researchers at University College London (UCL). Paranoia is the tendency to assume other people are trying to harm you when their actual motivations are unclear. “Being alert […]

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Many Psychopaths Unable to Detect True Fear or Sadness in Others

Individuals with high levels of psychopathic traits tend to have difficulty detecting genuine expressions of fear or sadness in others, according to a new study by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). Psychopathic traits may include lack of empathy, a grandiose sense of self-worth, lack of remorse or guilt, superficial charm, a high need […]

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Intensive Outpatient Program Shown to Ease Vets’ PTSD Symptoms

A three-week intensive outpatient therapy program (IOP) has been found to significantly reduce post-traumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms among military veterans. The intervention adds to the growing evidence that suggests providing several hours of therapy over several consecutive days is an effective method to address the unmet mental health needs of military veterans. Over […]

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Tip-Dependent Female Workers May Be at Greater Risk for Depressive Symptoms

Female hospitality workers who rely on tips in addition to base pay are more likely to report symptoms of depression compared with those who work in non-tipped positions, according to a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The analysis is based on data from a nationwide health study that tracked thousands of individuals […]

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9 in 10 Family Caregivers of Dementia Patients Suffer from Lack of Sleep

A new study finds that nine in 10 individuals caring for a family member with dementia experience poor sleep. Researchers from the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Nursing found that most caregivers in the study got less than six hours of sleep each night, exacerbated by frequent awakenings as often as four times per […]

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Portable Device Can Detect Brain Injury with Drop of Blood

Until now, the only reliable detector of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a computed tomography (CT) scan, which is only available in some hospitals and, in addition to being expensive, exposes patients to radiation. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland, in partnership with the Hospitals of Barcelona, Madrid and Seville, have […]

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Alzheimer’s Research Targets Variants of Sticky Brain Proteins

Emerging research has discovered that not all forms of amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein, the protein thought to initiate Alzheimer’s disease, contribute equally to the progress of the disease. In two new studies, investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston  developed a new way of preparing and extracting the protein as well as a new technique […]

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Study Probes How ADHD Meds Improve Cognition & Behavior in Kids

Although stimulants have been used for years to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in school-aged children, just how they reduce symptoms and improve behavior hasn’t been clear. A new study from researchers at the University of Buffalo now fills critical gaps about the way in which stimulants enhance cognitive functions. “This is the first study to demonstrate […]

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For Many with Severe Mental Illness, Spirituality Plays Role in Well-Being

A majority of young adults with severe mental illness, such as major depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, consider religion and spirituality relevant to their mental health, according to a new study published in the journal Spirituality in Clinical Practice. For the study, researchers from Baylor University interviewed a racially diverse sample of 55 young adults […]

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Mouse Study: Brain-Immune System Paths May Factor Into Alzheimer’s

Aging vessels connecting the brain and the immune system play critical roles in both Alzheimer’s disease and the decline in cognitive ability that comes with time, according to new research. By improving the function of the lymphatic vessels, scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine say they have “dramatically enhanced” aged mice’s ability […]

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Just 10 Minutes of Daily Chat Can Aid Well-Being of Dementia Patients

The average person with dementia in a nursing home experiences only two minutes of social interaction each day.  A new e-learning program that trains caregivers to engage in meaningful social interaction with dementia patients shows great promise for improving the well-being of the patient, according to a new UK study. “Care home staff are under […]

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Half of Female Students in Ontario Show Psychological Distress

A new study shows that just over 50 percent of teenage female students in Ontario, Canada, show signs of moderate to serious psychological distress. Psychological distress, which refers to symptoms of anxiety or depression, has been rising steadily among all Ontario students in Grades 7 to 12 since it was first monitored in 2013, according to […]

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Detecting Change Plays Critical Role in How We Remember

How well we remember recent events in our lives plays a key role in how our brains model what’s happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, according to new research. “Memory isn’t for trying to remember,” said Dr. Jeff Zacks, professor of psychology and brain sciences in Arts […]

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Fraternizing with Boss Can Backfire

New research suggests kissing up to the boss at work may help boost your career, but it also takes a lot of energy. Frequently, an individual’s capacity for self-control is diminished leaving one susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace. “There’s a personal cost to ingratiating yourself with your boss,” said Anthony Klotz, an associate […]

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AI Can Determine Personality By Tracking Your Eyes

They way you move your eyes may be a strong indicator of your personality type, according to a new study at the University of South Australia (UniSA) UniSA researchers in partnership with the University of Stuttgart (Germany), Flinders University (Australia) and the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (Germany) used state-of-the-art machine-learning algorithms to demonstrate a […]

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Warming Temps May Hike Suicide Rates in US, Mexico

Suicide rates are likely to increase as the earth gets warmer, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. The findings suggest that projected temperature increases through 2050 could lead to an additional 21,000 suicides in the United States and Mexico. “We’ve been studying the effects of warming on conflict and […]

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Mind-Body Therapies May Reduce Anxiety in Teens

Anxiety affects approximately one in three American teens, with more than eight percent experiencing severe impairment in daily functioning. But according to a new review published in The Nurse Practitioner, mind-body therapies, such as mindfulness, yoga and hypnosis, can play a vital role in reducing the very common problem of adolescent anxiety. “Mind-body therapies encompass […]

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In Anorexia, Brain’s Reward Response to Taste Tied to High Anxiety

In patients with anorexia nervosa, the brain’s reward response to taste is alternatively linked with high anxiety and a drive for thinness, and this association could play a role in driving the disorder, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus monitored a […]

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New Drug Shows Promise on 2 Alzheimer’s Fronts

An experimental drug for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was shown to both slow cognitive decline and clear the sticky protein clumps in the brain that are a hallmark of the devastating illness – for some patients. Researchers presented the latest findings Wednesday at the  Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago, and while this drug is the […]

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Brain Link Identified Between Depression and Poor Sleep

A new study may help shed light on why so many people with depression suffer from poor sleep. Researchers from the University of Warwick (UK) and Fudan University (China) found a strong connection between the areas of the brain associated with short-term memory, one’s sense of self, and negative emotions in people with depression. This […]

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