Tag: Economic fundamentals

Brexit Delay Will Not Postpone Deglobalisation

By Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, Professor of International Economics and Macroeconomics, Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University. Originally published at VoxEU Many associate Brexit and the Trumpian trade wars with the start of a new phase of deglobalisation. This column argues that we should view them as symptoms rather than causes, as the world had […]

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China’s Belt and Road Initiative vs Washington Consensus

Originally published by Inter Press Service With the Washington Consensus from the 1980s being challenged, President Donald Trump withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and China pursuing its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), most notably with its own initiatives such as the multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), the political and economic […]

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FIS and Worldpay’s Merger – Why Its “Bank in a Box” Tech Fantasy Will Go Nowhere

In a surprising but not really that surprising move announced Monday (March 18th), banking technology provider FIS is slated to merge with merchant and payment services provider Worldpay. The Wall Street Journal’s reporting is typically breathless: A global shake-up in the humdrum business of payments has set off a merger frenzy among the giant but […]

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Technology: From Copycats to Innovators

By Richard Vague, Managing Partner, Gabriel Investments and Chair, The Governor’s Woods Foundation. Originally published in Democracy; cross posted from the Institute for New Economic Thinking website In 1787, in his capacity as secretary of the Pennsylvania Society for the Encouragement of Manufactures and the Useful Arts, [Tench] Coxe had provided support for a British […]

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Bill Black: The Day Orthodox Economists Lost Their Minds and Integrity (#MMT)

Yves here. I’m behind reposting Bill Black’s series debunking the barrage of intellectually dishonest attacks being launched against MMT. I’m skipping over his fourth piece, Four “Tells” That Show Krugman Knows He Cannot Win an Honest Debate, but urge you to read it as well. By Bill Black, the author of The Best Way to Rob […]

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Of Course We Can Pay for a Green New Deal, but We Can’t Escape Hard Choices

Yves here. This post on the Green New Deal highlights an issue that hasn’t come close to getting the attention it warrants: the operational and organizational demands. However, it’s odd that the author does not consider revenue sharing, a program launched by that great American socialist Richard Nixon. Nixon believed that the federal government was […]

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Bill Black: MMT Takes Center Stage – and Orthodox Economists Freak

By Bill Black, the author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One, an associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and co-founder of Bank Whistleblowers United. Jointly published with New Economic Perspectives First Article in a Series The massive, coordinated assault on […]

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2018: A Banner Year for China, Other US Trade Partners, and Corporate America

By Wolf Richter, a San Francisco based executive, entrepreneur, start up specialist, and author, with extensive international work experience. Originally published at Wolf Street Exports increase economic activity as measured by GDP; and imports do the opposite, they reduce GDP though they tend to increase corporate profits — or else […]

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Have We Already Passed World Peak Oil and World Peak Coal?

By Gail Tverberg, an actuary interested in finite world issues – oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Originally published at Our Finite World Most people expect that our signal of an impending reduction in world oil or coal production will be high prices. Looking at historical […]

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China Syndrome Redux: New Results on Global Labour Reallocation

Yves here. This article has a significant finding. It contends that while the shift of manufacturing jobs from the US to China did create a tremendous number of jobs in China, it did not lead to an increase in manufacturing wages. This would seem implausible until you remember that China […]

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Deregulating Banks Fueled Speculation, Not Productive Investment

Yves here. While most readers probably accept the idea that letting banks run wild did more for financiers than the real economy, it’s still important to test the idea empirically. By Josh Ryan-Collins, PhD, Head of Research at University College London’s Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose. He was previously Senior […]

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The Green New Deal: Just Focus on What We Do, Not How We Pay for It

By Marshall Auerback, a market analyst and commentator. Produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute Extreme weather variations and increasingly dire scientific reports have spurred surprisingly robust policy proposals for a Green New Deal. Rather admirably, the resolution sponsored by Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) and Rep. Alexandria […]

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Brexit: MPs Sink to a New Collective Low of Incompetent Acquiescence

Yves here. I’m glad to see someone call out Parliament after having seen May successfully play it again and again. How many time has she moved back the date of the required Meaningful Vote? Ignored Cabinet resignations and even an unheard of censure? Let us understand all that happened: May […]

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Nomi Prins: Survival of the Richest, The March of Inequality

Yves here. Keep in mind that historically, the levelers of inequality have been war, financial crises, protracted battles by workers to get better incomes and workplace protections, and, of course, revolutions. By Nomi Prins, a former Wall Street executive, whose latest book is Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World […]

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The Yellow Vest Phenomenon and the Radical Right

Yves here. While imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the gilet jaunes may not be so happy to have right wing yellow vest copy-cats. By Rob May, who is currently completing a PhD. on the radical right at Sheffield Hallam University. His work focuses on British fascism’s links and […]

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How Much Will It Cost to Address Climate Change? Pennies Compared to the Alternative

By Thomas Neuburger. Originally published at DownWithTryanny! Economic growth and global warming, Figure 1 from a paper studying “Global non­linear effect of temperature on economic production” (link below). “Non-linear” in this case means “at what warming point do economies tend to ‘fall off a cliff’”? It’s not the same point […]

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Warren Buffett Denounces Deficit Hawkery in His Latest Shareholder Letter

Warren Buffett admitted he was wrong about deficits. Wish he had figured this out before 2009, when the Obama Administration was afraid of launching a big enough stimulus package. From his annual shareholders’ letter: Sadly aside from Axios, I don’t seen this point getting the attention it deserves. But maybe […]

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Wolf Richter: My Fancy-Schmancy “Fed Hawk-o-Meter” Ticks Down, Still Red-Lines. In Passing, Fed Plants Seed for Removing “Patient”

Yves here. It is disheartening to see the degree to which the Fed has embraced mission creep and then has proven not to be very good at it. It was bad enough that Paul Volcker weakened the Fed’s commitment to full employment by taking the position that any inflation is […]

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Opioid Crisis Shows How Economic Inequality Kills

By Lynn Parramore, Senior Research Analyst at the Institute for New Economic Thinking. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Pharmaceutical pushers like Purdue Pharma “couldn’t have done their dirty work” without America’s increasingly unbalanced economy America’s growing rate of economic inequality is more than a numerical […]

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France’s Institutional System Favours Rebellion Against Its Leader

Yves here. This article describes some key elements of France’s political system that have stoked the gilet jaunes movement. By André Sapir, a Senior Fellow at Bruegel, University Professor at the Université libre de Bruxelles, and Research Fellow of the London-based Centre for Economic Policy Research. Cross posted from Bruegel; […]

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Bill Black: Modern Monetary Theory Is On the March (#MMT)

By Bill Black, the author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One, an associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and co-founder of Bank Whistleblowers United. Jointly published with New Economic Perspectives Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) continues to advance rapidly.  We are […]

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Is the Opioid Overdose Crisis a Story of Supply or Demand? Depends Where You Look

By Shannon Monnat, an Associate Professor of Sociology and the Lerner Chair of Public Health Promotion at Syracuse University. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Over the past two decades deaths from opioids and other drugs have grown to be a major U.S. health problem, but […]

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