Tag: Economic fundamentals

Is This Time Different? Examining Recent Emerging-Market Turbulence

By Dr. Marek Dabrowski, a Non-Resident Scholar at Bruegel, Professor at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, co-founder and Fellow at CASE – Center for Social and Economic Research in Warsaw and Member of the Scientific Council of the E.T. Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy in Moscow. Originally published […]

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High Stakes, Entrenched Interests And The Trump Rollback Of Environmental Regulations

By Julie Appleby, Senior Correspondent at Kaiser Health News. Before joining KHN, Julie spent 10 years covering the health industry and policy at USA TODAY. She also worked at the San Francisco Chronicle, The Financial Times in London and the Contra Costa Times in Walnut Creek, California. She serves on […]

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Apple’s “Capital Return Program”: Rewarding the Wrong People

By William Lazonick, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Lowell. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website The enormous revenues and profits flowing from Apple’s innovative products, the iPhone in particular, get primary credit for enabling the company to be the first in history to reach a […]

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Trump and the Midterms: Is It Not The Economy, Stupid?

By Barkley Rosser, Professor of Economics at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Originally published at EconoSpeak On many Mondays I indulge in taking Robert J. Samuelson to task after his regular Washington Post column of the day.  Today he was almost right, or if you prefer, even mostly right.  […]

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AOC Rental Woes a Reminder of Worsening Conditions for Workers

The media coverage of the fact that Alexandria Ocascio-Cortez can’t yet move to Washington because she can’t afford to rent an apartment is another Versailles circa 1788 moments. Washington has so long been expensive that even before working-class AOC stormed the barricades there have long been stories of Congresscritters who […]

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Cryptocurrencies: Financial (In)stability and (Un)fairness

By Jon Danielsson, Director of the ESRC funded Systemic Risk Centre, London School of Economics. Originally published at VoxEU Cryptocurrencies are controversial.  Advocates see them as a better form of money that imparts freedom, useful economic functions, fabulous riches and hedges against bad government policies. The sceptics worry about investor protection […]

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Wolf Richter: The State of the American Debt Slaves, Q3 2018

By Wolf Richter, a San Francisco based executive, entrepreneur, start up specialist, and author, with extensive international work experience. Originally published at Wolf Street Consumer debt – or euphemistically, consumer “credit” – jumped 4.9% in the third quarter compared to the third quarter last year, or by $182 billion, to […]

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Gaius Publius: Why Is Thomas Frank Puzzled?

By Gaius Publius, a professional writer living on the West Coast of the United States and frequent contributor to DownWithTyranny, digby, Truthout, and Naked Capitalism. Follow him on Twitter @Gaius_Publius, Tumblr and Facebook. GP article archive  here. Originally published at DownWithTyranny A Bernie Sanders event in Madison, Wisconsin during the 2016 Democratic Party primary I […]

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The Unforeseen Consequences Of China’s Insatiable Oil Demand

By Tim Daiss, an oil markets analyst, journalist and author that has been working out of the Asia-Pacific region for 12 years. I’ve covered oil, energy markets and geopolitics for Forbes, Platts, Interfax, NewsBase, Rigzone, and the UK-based Independent (newspaper) as well as providing energy markets analysis for subscription newsletters. I’ve also authored geopolitical reports […]

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Michel Barnier Nixes Theresa May’s Customs Union Scheme as Bad Brexit Dynamics Worsen

Not surprisingly, the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier has rejected Theresa May’s customs plan. But what was striking was that despite Richard North seeing Barnier as having candy-coated some issues, on the whole Barnier seemed to take a sharper tone with the UK than before. Barnier is enough of a pro that it is unlikely […]

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China Pumps $74B Into Banks Amid Credit Crisis

By Alex Kimani, a veteran finance writer, investor, engineer and researcher for Divergente Research LLC and Safehaven.com. Originally published at Safehaven Worried about an economic slowdown amid worsening trade relations with the U.S. and a credit crisis sparked by a massive deleveraging drive, China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC), has unexpectedly made […]

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Brexit Crash Out Virtually Certain

On the one hand, a great deal appears to have happened with respect to Brexit in the last two weeks, with David Davis and Boris Johnson resigning from Government and Theresa May stating that she will lead the Brexit negotiations. Despite the threat of an ouster, she’s still the last woman standing. However, in reality […]

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Argentina 20 Years On: Has the IMF Really Changed Its Ways?

By Gino Brunswijck, Maria Jose Romero and Bodo Ellmers of The European Network on Debt and Development (Eurodad). Originally published at TripleCrisis Argentinians are experiencing deja-vu this month as the government announces massive layoffs and a hiring freeze as part of an adjustment package attached to a loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Thousands […]

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America’s Subprime Economy

An important story in Reuters (hat tip Scott) described how the current expansion, in a break with the past two decades, depends on the spending of lower-income households, and that spending in turn is heavily dependent on rising debt levels. The bottom line is that the last two years of growth were brought to you […]

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Economy of Intangibles

By Silvia Merler, an Affiliate Fellow at Bruegel and previously an Economic Analyst in DG Economic and Financial Affairs of the European Commission. Originally published at Bruegel Economists have been discussing the implications of the rise of the intangible economy in relation to the secular stagnation hypothesis, and looking more generally into the policy implications […]

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Trump’s Visit Marks the Start of Shock Doctrine Brexit

Yves here. The setup for this post has been trumped by events, with Hair Furore doing his best imitation of Emily Litella. From the Financial Times: Donald Trump has sought to repair the diplomatic wounds he inflicted on Theresa May by insisting whatever course the British prime minister took on the UK’s future relationship with […]

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Leaving Money on the Table: Declining Responsiveness and the Productivity Slowdown

Ryan Decker, Economist, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, John Haltiwanger, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Maryland, Ron Jarmin, Acting Director, U.S. Census Bureau, and Javier Miranda, Principal Economist, Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications. Originally published at VoxEU. When we think about what determines an economy’s […]

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Interview: Teaching Graham Elwood Modern Money, and How the Progressive Media Gets It Wrong

By Naked Capitalism reader aliteralmind, aka Jeff Epstein, an independent and progressive journalist and podcaster with Citizens’ Media TV. Jeff ran on the ballot with Bernie Sanders during the 2016 Democratic primary, at the request of the Sanders campaign. He was a pledged delegate for Sanders at the DNC, and one of only 60 finalists […]

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Richard Murphy: The Debate on the Proper Role of the Bank of England, Continued

Yves here. One reason for featuring this post was that the discussion of the role of the Bank of England also has implications for the role of the Fed and other central banks. Murphy’s post takes on the claim of central bank independence. That is code for “the management of a country’s finances must be […]

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Brexit: Chaos Visible

Rather late in the game, some high profile corporate players have cleared their throats to say that Something Must Be Done about Brexit. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders warned that Brexit uncertainty was putting 860,000 auto industry jobs at risk and was responsible for investment dropping by 50% in 2018 compared to the […]

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Why Italy’s Crisis Is the Left’s Crisis

By Carlo d’Ippoliti, Associate Professor of Economics, Sapienza University of Rome. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Current turmoil in Italy is the result of lack of a clear political majority. An attempt at forming a so-called populist majority shows the real face of populism in the country, which is conservative […]

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Why Did Trump Win? Robots Are to Blame

At the end of this post, I’ve embedded a paper by Carl Benedikt Frey, Thor Berger, and Chinchih Chen, all of Oxford Martin, titled Political machinery: did robots swing the 2016 US presidential election? It argues that the propensity to vote for Trump is best explained by the exposure to the local economy of job […]

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