Tag: Free markets and their discontents

$15 Minimum Wage: Job Killer or Path Out of Poverty?

This Real News Network segment sets forth the most common arguments against increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, or alternatively, a living wage level, and shows why they don’t hold up to scrutiny. A decent minimum wage is even more important when the supposedly robust US economy is […]

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The Downside of Market-Minded Philanthropy

By David Campbell, Associate Professor of Public Administration, Binghamton University, State University of New York. Originally published at The Conversation Billionaires made some eye-popping donations in 2018. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced plans to spend US$2 billion to help the homeless and create a network of free preschools. Media mogul […]

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Thoughts on Warren and Sanders: How Much Change Is Needed in 2021?

Yves here. I know Warren is deemed to be progressive by American standards, but I recall clearly when I first say her speak at a Roosevelt Institute conference, Let Markets Be Markets, which was a title I found to be unhelpful, since it suggested that markets would exist in a […]

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Here’s What a Real Strike Looks Like: 150 Million Say No to Despotism in India

Yves here. Even though the gilet jaunes are getting a lot of interest due to the vivid images of damage to Paris, other important protests for labor and against inequality are being neglected by the Western media. One is against anti-labor “reforms” in India. By  Vijay Prashad, an Indian historian, […]

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Kiss What Is Left of Your Medical Data Privacy Goodbye

Matt Stoller warned back in 2012 that insurers would increasingly induce, then force, customers to agree to surveillance. But a Wall Street Journal story tonight describes how insurers and medical providers, meaning your doctor’s employers, are actively cooperating, so as among other things, to help Big Pharma peddle more drugs […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Response to Reader Comments

This post was first published on December 12, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part VI – Certainty

This post was first published on December 6, 2018 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part V – Dark Realities

This post was first published on December 5, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part IV – The Journey into a Libertarian Past

This post was first published on December 2, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

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Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part III – Regulation

Lambert here: Andrew’s dead-pan voice and genre-bending technique seem to perplexed some readers. “Journey into a Libertarian Future” is not a genuine interview, although it is cast in the form of an interview. The interviewee, “Code Name Cain,” is fictional, but also a proxy for the libertarian thought leader, Hans […]

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My Theory About Gold as Diversification to the Busted “Everything Bubble”

Lambert here: There’s no way I’m opening up comments for a post about gold, and be very careful not to go crazy over in Links, either. Plus I don’t care about shiny substances. However, Wolf’s thinking on asset correlation in the “Everything Bubble” is interesting, which is why I’m cross-posting […]

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Neoliberalism as Structure and Ideology

Yves here. While Dorman offers an interesting theory as to how neoliberalism gained traction, I don’t see it as explaining as much as Dorman thinks it does. His discussion does not acknowledge that a well-funded effort to turn the country right was underway well before the severe recession of the […]

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“Summer” Rerun: Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part II – The Strategy

This post first appeared on November 30, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. Simulposted […]

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“Summer” Rerun: Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part I –The Vision

Yves here. In some summers past, we’ve rerun NC classics during slow news periods. We haven’t had slow news period in a while, and one side effect is that we haven’t yet reprised this series on libertarianism, which will run this week and into next week. Enjoy! This post first […]

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Stumped by the Stock Market Slump? Start by Picturing a Used Car Dealership

Lambert here: Even I know what a lemon market is! By Steven Pressman, Professor of Economics, Colorado State University. Originally published at Alternet. Stocks have been slumping on a variety of concerns, from President Donald Trump’s ongoing trade war with China to worries about an economic slowdown and rising interest […]

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Michael Hudson: The Vocabulary of Economic Deception

Originally published at Michael Hudson’s website This is Guns and Butter, October 8, 2018. The aim of classical economics was to tax unearned income, not wages and profits. The tax burden was to fall on the landlord class first and foremost, then on monopolists and bankers. The result was to […]

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How Immoral Are Laissez Faire Ideologues? Ask About Drones.

Yves here. The Politico European newsletter today confirms that drones are a flight safety risk that hasn’t been addressed in any systematic way: UNLEASH THE EAGLES THIS CHRISTMAS: Here is some transport policy news that everyone traveling around Europe over the holiday should care about. Drone disruption is an increasing problem, […]

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Short-Term Rentals and the Housing Market: Evidence from Airbnb in Los Angeles

Yves here. This is an important analysis. Even though it confirms what would seem intuitively obvious, that Airbnb helps investor/owners and hurts renters, Airbnb boosters have tried arguing that restrictions on short-term rentals would not produce the desired effect. The data from Los Angeles shows the reverse, particularly in tourist […]

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The UK’s Reform of Limited Partnership Law: Dead on Arrival (I)

“Scottish Limited Partnerships are used by thousands of legitimate British businesses – from pension schemes to owning farm land in Scotland – to invest more than £30 billion in the UK a year. We have seen mounting evidence that in their current form they are vulnerable to abuse. Last year […]

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Debate: The ‘Gilets Jaunes’ Movement Is Not a Facebook Revolution

By Jen Schradie, Assistant Professor, Observatoire sociologique du changement, Axa Research Fund Fellow, Sciences Po – USPC. Originally published at The Conversation In less than a month, France’s gilets jaunes (yellow vests) have gone from being a celebrated example of Facebook’s ability to power a spontaneous revolution to a cautionary […]

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What the US Could Learn from Thailand About Health Care Coverage

By Joseph Harris, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Boston University. Originally published at The Conversation The open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) draws to a close on Dec. 15. Yet, recent assaults on the ACA by the Trump administration stand in marked contrast to efforts to expand access […]

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