Tag: Free markets and their discontents

When the Middle Class Lost Its Wealth

By Moritz Schularick, Professor of Economics, University of Bonn. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking We live in unequal times. The causes and consequences of widening disparities in income and wealth are a defining debate of our age. Recent research by Thomas Piketty and his co-authors has […]

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Everything You Thought You Knew About Western Civilization Is Wrong: A Review of Michael Hudson’s new book And Forgive Them Their Debts

By John Siman To say that Michael Hudson’s new book And Forgive Them Their Debts: Lending, Foreclosure, and Redemption from Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year (ISLET 2018) is profound is an understatement on the order of saying that the Mariana Trench is deep. To grasp his central argument […]

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High Stakes, Entrenched Interests And The Trump Rollback Of Environmental Regulations

By Julie Appleby, Senior Correspondent at Kaiser Health News. Before joining KHN, Julie spent 10 years covering the health industry and policy at USA TODAY. She also worked at the San Francisco Chronicle, The Financial Times in London and the Contra Costa Times in Walnut Creek, California. She serves on […]

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Trump and the Midterms: Is It Not The Economy, Stupid?

By Barkley Rosser, Professor of Economics at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Originally published at EconoSpeak On many Mondays I indulge in taking Robert J. Samuelson to task after his regular Washington Post column of the day.  Today he was almost right, or if you prefer, even mostly right.  […]

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AOC Rental Woes a Reminder of Worsening Conditions for Workers

The media coverage of the fact that Alexandria Ocascio-Cortez can’t yet move to Washington because she can’t afford to rent an apartment is another Versailles circa 1788 moments. Washington has so long been expensive that even before working-class AOC stormed the barricades there have long been stories of Congresscritters who […]

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The Super Rich Get Even Richer

By Paul Rogers, professor in the department of peace studies at Bradford University, northern England. He is openDemocracy’s international security adviser, and has been writing a weekly column on global security since 28 September 2001; he also writes a monthly briefing for the Oxford Research Group. His latest book is Irregular War: ISIS […]

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Cryptocurrencies: Financial (In)stability and (Un)fairness

By Jon Danielsson, Director of the ESRC funded Systemic Risk Centre, London School of Economics. Originally published at VoxEU Cryptocurrencies are controversial.  Advocates see them as a better form of money that imparts freedom, useful economic functions, fabulous riches and hedges against bad government policies. The sceptics worry about investor protection […]

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From Brothels to Independence: The Neoliberalization of (Sex) Work

Yves here. Further confirmation that the gig economy is not what it is cracked up to be. Sex workers in the UK have less privacy, lower returns, and much less safety in the days of online platforms than they did when brothels dominated the profession. By Ava Caradonna, a migrant, […]

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Gaius Publius: Why Is Thomas Frank Puzzled?

By Gaius Publius, a professional writer living on the West Coast of the United States and frequent contributor to DownWithTyranny, digby, Truthout, and Naked Capitalism. Follow him on Twitter @Gaius_Publius, Tumblr and Facebook. GP article archive  here. Originally published at DownWithTyranny A Bernie Sanders event in Madison, Wisconsin during the 2016 Democratic Party primary I […]

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Misperceptions About Immigration and Support for Redistribution

By Alberto Alesina, Professor of Political Economy, Harvard University, Armando Miano, PhD student in Economics, Harvard University, and Stefanie Stantcheva, Professor of Economics, Harvard University. Originally published at VoxEU The debate on immigration is often based on misperceptions about the number and character of immigrants. The column uses data from surveys in six countries to […]

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Missed Visits, Uncontrolled Pain And Fraud: Report Says Hospices Lacks Oversight

Yves here. Hospices in theory offer an alternative to the US medical model that Lambert has described as “Insert tube, extract rent.” In practice, sadly, even patients in their closing months of life need to be vigilant about their choice of provider. By Melissa Bailey, a Boston-based correspondent on the KHN enterprise team, focusing on […]

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Google Android: European ‘Techlash’ or Milestone in Antitrust Enforcement?

By Cristina Caffarra Vice President and Head of European Competition Practice, Oliver Latham, Vice President, European Competition Practice, Matthew Bennett, Vice President, Federico Etro, Professor, University of Florence; Senior Consultant, Pierre Régibeau, Vice President, Robert Stillman Vice President; all saver Professor Etro of Charles River Associates. Originally published at VoxEU The European Commission’s decision to […]

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Can the Migration Plan of Spain’s PSOE Reverse the Fortunes of Europe’s Social Democrats?

By Giacomo Riccio, an international relations and diplomacy graduate. Originally published at openDemocracy/strong> European social democratic parties of the most populated EU countries have been trudging through stagnant water for the last ten years and will certainly keep struggling in the next decades too, unless a game change occurs. That game changer could go by […]

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Michel Barnier Nixes Theresa May’s Customs Union Scheme as Bad Brexit Dynamics Worsen

Not surprisingly, the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier has rejected Theresa May’s customs plan. But what was striking was that despite Richard North seeing Barnier as having candy-coated some issues, on the whole Barnier seemed to take a sharper tone with the UK than before. Barnier is enough of a pro that it is unlikely […]

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Tom Engelhardt: Three Failing Experiments – Mine, America’s Humanity’s?

Yves here. It’s a bit puzzling to see Engelhardt depict populism as a right wing-phenomenon; the mainstream press is eager to warn of the dangers of populists like Bernie Sanders and the 5 Star movement. But dealing with body failures and limitations is a pointed reminder of mortality and the question of whether there was […]

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The Middle Precariat: The Downwardly Mobile Middle Class

By Lynn Parramore, Senior Research Analyst at the Institute for New Economic Thinking. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website It wasn’t supposed to be like this. The children of America’s white-collar middle class viewed life from their green lawns and tidy urban flats as a field of opportunity. Blessed with quality […]

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Financial Times: Chinese Officials “Awed” by Trump’s “Skill as a Strategist and Tactician”

A Financial Times article, The Chinese are wary of Donald Trump’s creative destruction, by Mark Leonard, director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, is so provocative, in terms of the contrast with Western perceptions of Trump, that I am quoting from it at some length. According to Leonard, quite a few key players in […]

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Michael Hudson: Argentina’s New $50 Billion IMF Loan Is Designed to Replay its 2001 Crisis

Yves here. In this Real News Network interview, Micheal Hudson explains why IMF “programs” inevitably hurt workers. SHARMINI PERIES: It’s The Real News Network. I’m Sharmini Peries, coming to you from Baltimore. For several months now. Argentines have been taking to the streets to protest against neoliberal austerity measures of President Mauricio Macri. The most […]

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Argentina 20 Years On: Has the IMF Really Changed Its Ways?

By Gino Brunswijck, Maria Jose Romero and Bodo Ellmers of The European Network on Debt and Development (Eurodad). Originally published at TripleCrisis Argentinians are experiencing deja-vu this month as the government announces massive layoffs and a hiring freeze as part of an adjustment package attached to a loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Thousands […]

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(Mis)Adventures in Portland and a Visit to Occupy ICE

I’ll have more to say about some of the other meetups just completed (Chicago, Green Bay, San Francisco, and Seattle), since I learned a lot at each of them. However, quite a lot happened at the Portland one, plus reader Andrew Watts showed up my tardiness by providing his own write up of the event. […]

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John Feffer: Trump Doctrine as Kamikaze Antiglobalism

Yves here. I imagine readers will take issue with some of the lower-level arguments in this piece, such as claiming that Obama was trying to address climate change, when he joined the Paris Accord late in his time in office and as Gaius Publius has written at length, was a strong supporter of fracking. Nevertheless, […]

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Trump Tariffs Hit Largest US Aluminum Company, ALCOA

Yves here. As we’ve said, tariffs are a blunt instrument. By Barkley Rosser, Professor of Economics at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Originally published at Angry Bear In the history of antitrust law, one of the most important rulings by the US Supreme Court came in 1945, when the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA), […]

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