Tag: Magazine

Nihilist in Chief

In the midst of this January’s historic, senselessly protracted government shutdown, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell decided it was time to put forward his vision of how government should properly function. So he took to the Washington Post op-ed section to deride a modest set of Democratic proposals to institute election and voting rights reform. […]

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Adventures in Modernism

What was it like to be a queer child in South Carolina during the Great Depression? Guy Davenport, with his incomparable gift for re-creating lost pockets of time, offered one plausible glimpse in his short story “A Gingham Dress,” published in 1990. The scene is a roadside mart, where a hillbilly family is selling homegrown […]

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Can American Foreign Policy Be Greened?

In the 1977 novel Edith’s Diary, by the great crime writer Patricia Highsmith, Edith is the mother of a dipsomaniacal good-for-nothing who records in her diary not the truth about her son but, instead, the compensatory fantasy that he is a grad student in engineering, the husband of a charming wife, […]

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The Crime of Parenting While Poor

One morning in May, on the fifth floor of an office building in the St. George neighborhood of Staten Island, New York, five mothers and seven small children sat in a circle, singing a song to the tune of “Frère Jacques.” One by one, in Spanish and English, they made […]

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Two Traditions

Herbert CrolyNew Republic Archive A former editor of this publication, Franklin Foer, has asserted that The New Republic “invented modern liberalism.” Another ex-editor, Hendrik Hertzberg, has contended, contrariwise, that there’s a case to be made “that civic republicanism, as much or more than liberalism, was TNR’s founding creed.” Actually, Foer […]

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The Nerdy, Ruthless Parodies of Documentary Now!

Documentary Now! is television for people who love movies—more specifically, documentary films. This may be a growing niche. Documentary has undergone something of a renaissance in the last ten years, as streaming platforms have focused on bingeable nonfiction films and series that spark detailed, intense debate: Did Robert Durst really murder […]

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The Future of Meat Is Vegan

In August 2013, Mark Post, a professor of physiology at Maastricht University, held a press conference in a television studio kitchen in London. Lifting the silver lid from a platter, he revealed a creation that seemed very humble by culinary-TV standards: a round, palm-size patty of dark pink hamburger meat. […]

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Off the Map

In February 2003, Al Jazeera broadcast an interview with Donald Rumsfeld, then George W. Bush’s secretary of defense. “Would it worry you,” the interviewer asked him, “if you go by force into Iraq that this might create the impression that the United States is becoming an imperial, colonial power?” Rumsfeld […]

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The Spy Who Wasn’t

On a steamy Sunday last July, at about half-past noon, a caravan of unmarked SUVs exited the FBI’s Washington, D.C., field office, an eight-story concrete building that exudes all the charm of a supermax prison. The cars moved swiftly across the city; speed was critical. There were indications that the […]

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Big Tech’s Unholy Alliance With the Pentagon

In September 2017, Google began work on Project Maven, a Pentagon program that provides artificial intelligence software for drone warfare. More than ten employees were tasked with building a highly realistic surveillance system, like Google Earth, that would render whole cities and buildings, classifying cars as cars and people as […]

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Google Is Struggling to Remake Itself for the #MeToo Era

As in so many cases of sexual harassment, it was not the incident that sparked the most outrage, but the employer’s response. 
 In 2012, Andy Rubin, the Google executive who developed the Android operating systems, started dating a woman who worked for him. By 2013, she wanted to end […]

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The False Promise of Silicon Valley’s Quest to Save the World

Companies in Silicon Valley are wonderfully fond of describing themselves as “mission-driven.” Palantir has raised nearly $2 billion “working for the common good” and “doing what’s right.” At Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes promised “actionable information at the time it matters.” And for the past four years, Google and Facebook have occupied […]

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The Stark Political Divide Between Tech CEOs and Their Employees

Two years ago, two Stanford professors teamed up with a journalist to survey more than 600 “elite technology company leaders and founders” about their political views. The average executive, they found, believes in free markets, supports gay marriage, likes environmental protection, hates unions, and distrusts regulation. He says he wants […]

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The Story Behind the Green New Deal’s Meteoric Rise

On November 13, 2018, just days after Democrats reclaimed the House of Representatives, dozens of young activists filed silently into Representative Nancy Pelosi’s office on Capitol Hill. Some sat down along the walls of the office, unfurling banners and forming a circle. Others stood in the center and told their […]

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Resistance Training

Since Donald Trump became president, the United States has seen over 20,000 street protests. While this number includes some pro-Trump rallies, most of the events voiced opposition to the administration. Between hundreds of Women’s Marches, the airport protests, the Tax March, the March for Science, the March for Truth, the […]

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Mommy and Data

In 2009, Piraye Yurttas Beim, a molecular biologist from Texas, started pitching investors on her vision for a new kind of women’s health company. The startup she had founded, Celmatix, would bring the power of big data and cutting-edge genetic testing to bear on a problem that had long resisted […]

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