Tag: Native Americans

The Northland’s Forgotten Border

American policies have complicated life along the often remote and haphazard line dividing the United States and Canada. By Porter Fox Mr. Fox spent the last three years traveling along America’s northern border. July 21, 2018 At 5,525 miles, the United States-Canada border is the world’s longest land boundary, more than double the length of […]

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A Canadian Museum Promotes Indigenous Art. But Don’t Call It ‘Indian.’

TORONTO — A group of visitors young and old gathered at the Art Gallery of Ontario in front of a well-known Canadian painting the docent called “Church in Yuquot Village.” It was a peaceful 1929 image by a national figure, Emily Carr, showing a Mowachaht/Muchalaht settlement she had visited on Vancouver Island. The docent was […]

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Tracing the Roots of South Carolina’s ‘Turks,’ Before They Melt Away

The new book may settle the question of where the Turks came from, but it comes at a time when their insularity and distinctiveness has been melting away through intermarriage and migration. Brian Benenhaley’s mother, April Benenhaley, is a white New Yorker who moved to Sumter County when her military father was transferred to Shaw […]

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A Story of Survival Revived by the Cicadas’ Loud (and Crunchy) Return

ONONDAGA NATION — The cicadas return with no regard for subtlety. Their trill vibrates through the thick woods that cover much of the Onondaga Nation, sounding to those who welcome them like a natural symphony and registering in other ears as something akin to a muffled car alarm. These days, they are inescapable: thwapping into […]

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Video Shows Border Patrol Vehicle Hitting Native American Man, Then Driving Away

ALBUQUERQUE — Tensions flared on Friday between federal authorities in Arizona and residents of a Native American reservation straddling the border with Mexico after a video surfaced in which a Border Patrol vehicle appears to hit a man from the tribe before driving away. The video, which was recorded on the phone of the victim, […]

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Trilobites: Aztec Turquoise Tiles May Solve a Mesoamerican Mystery

Advertisement A recent geochemical analysis calls into question the idea of extensive contact between Mesoamerican and Southwest American cultures before the Spanish invaded. June 13, 2018 ImageA reconstructed turquoise mosaic recovered from Templo Mayor, the main temple of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, in present day Mexico City.CreditOliver Santana/Editorial Raíces With its brilliant hues of […]

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‘This Ruling Gives Us Hope’: Supreme Court Sides With Tribe in Salmon Case

SKAGIT RIVER, Wash. — There was a time when the murky waters of the Skagit River offered bountiful salmon harvests to the Swinomish Indians of Washington State. They could fill an entire boat with one cast of the net back then, and even on a slow day, they could count on hauling in dozens of […]

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Win or Lose, Tuesday’s Primaries Are a Big Deal for Women

Now the question is whether black women can succeed as candidates, as well — one reason Stacey Abrams’s recent victory in the Georgia primary for governor attracted so much attention. After Mr. Jones’s victory, Glamour anointed Alabama the state to watch, because, it said, the state has more black women running for office than any […]

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The Long History of Child-Snatching

African-Americans were not alone in suffering separations. Starting in 1879, tens of thousands of Native Americans were required to leave their families and attend boarding schools. Richard Pratt, an Army officer who founded the first one, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, in Pennsylvania, summarized his philosophy this way: “A great general has said that the […]

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Matter: The Great Breakup: The First Arrivals to the Americas Split Into Two Groups

Early inhabitants of the Americas split into two populations over 13,000 years ago, according to a new study of ancient DNA, and remained separated for thousands of years. Eventually, somewhere, the two groups met again and began commingling. Today, their descendants inhabit a vast region stretching from Mexico to the southern tip of South America. […]

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Profile: With ‘There There,’ Tommy Orange Has Written a New Kind of American Epic

“At I.A.I.A., I felt we were building an aesthetic,” Ms. Mailhot said. ‘We’re not interested in rewriting what’s already out there.” After graduating and selling their books, Ms. Mailhot and Mr. Orange both decided to teach at I.A.I.A. The task feels even more vital following the allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct against the novelist […]

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