Tag: Social values

Of Course We Can Pay for a Green New Deal, but We Can’t Escape Hard Choices

Yves here. This post on the Green New Deal highlights an issue that hasn’t come close to getting the attention it warrants: the operational and organizational demands. However, it’s odd that the author does not consider revenue sharing, a program launched by that great American socialist Richard Nixon. Nixon believed that the federal government was […]

Read More

A Way-Too-Early Handicapping of the 2020 Presidential Race

By Thomas Neuburger. Originally published at DownWithTyranny! [embedded content]A cigarette, martini, a staircase and Bette Davis — the 2020 election in a nutshell There are two groups of candidates in the Democratic candidate field. The first group contains people like Bernie Sanders. The second group contains all other candidates whom corporate Democratic power brokers will […]

Read More

The 2020 Democrats of the ‘Anti-Green New Deal Coalition’

By Kendra Chamberlain, a freelance journalist overing renewable energy technology and smart infrastructure. Originally published at DeSmog Blog Follow her on twitter @KendraRC976 Support for the ambitious Green New Deal proposal has uncovered widening rifts within the Democratic Party as presidential candidates begin fleshing out their 2020 platforms. To date, […]

Read More

#MeToo Whistleblowing Is Upending Century-Old Legal Precedent Demanding Loyalty to the Boss

Yves here. I have to confess that I didn’t know that legal protection for whistleblowers is a relatively new development. By Elizabeth C. Tippett, Associate Professor, School of Law, University of Oregon. Originally published at The Conversation When was the last time you agreed to keep a secret? Perhaps it […]

Read More

France, Inequality, the Yellow Vests, and the Social Elevator

Lambert: I’m not sure that a “social elevator” is the metaphor I find most appealing for redistribution. How about one of those little folding stepladders that you see in kitchens? By Laurence Boone, Chief Economist, OECD, and Antoine Goujard, Senior Economist, OECD.Originally published at VoxEU. The ‘yellow vest’ demonstrations in […]

Read More

Who Is Really A Socialist?

Yves here. Although this post does a very helpful job of parsing out the critical ideas that travelers under the “socialist” banner may hold, a shortcoming is how Rosser treats the idea of “ownership” of production. The original Marxist construct developed when businessmen owned mills and workshops directly, as in […]

Read More

Is the Opioid Overdose Crisis a Story of Supply or Demand? Depends Where You Look

By Shannon Monnat, an Associate Professor of Sociology and the Lerner Chair of Public Health Promotion at Syracuse University. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Over the past two decades deaths from opioids and other drugs have grown to be a major U.S. health problem, but […]

Read More

How Neoliberalism Is Normalising Hostility

Yves here. Even though this post paints with very bright colors, I imagine most readers will agree with the argument it makes about the destructive social impact of neoliberalism. Some additional points to consider: Neoliberalism puts markets above all else. In this paradigm, you are supposed to uproot yourself if […]

Read More

How Teacher Strikes Are Exposing the Corrupt Charter School Agenda

By Jeff Bryant, a writing fellow and chief correspondent for Our Schools, a project of the Independent Media Institute. He is a communications consultant, freelance writer, advocacy journalist, and director of the Education Opportunity Network, a strategy and messaging center for progressive education policy. His award-winning commentary and reporting routinely […]

Read More

France’s Great Debate

Yves here. Wowsers, does Macron not know basic French history? The last time a ruler asked la toute France for its opinion about the problems of the day, the situation developed not necessarily to his advantage. From Wikipedia: The Cahiers de doléances (or simply Cahiers as they were often known) […]

Read More

Thoughts on Warren and Sanders: How Much Change Is Needed in 2021?

Yves here. I know Warren is deemed to be progressive by American standards, but I recall clearly when I first say her speak at a Roosevelt Institute conference, Let Markets Be Markets, which was a title I found to be unhelpful, since it suggested that markets would exist in a […]

Read More

Here’s What a Real Strike Looks Like: 150 Million Say No to Despotism in India

Yves here. Even though the gilet jaunes are getting a lot of interest due to the vivid images of damage to Paris, other important protests for labor and against inequality are being neglected by the Western media. One is against anti-labor “reforms” in India. By  Vijay Prashad, an Indian historian, […]

Read More

Journey into a Libertarian Future: Response to Reader Comments

This post was first published on December 12, 2011 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

Read More

Joining a Group Makes Us Nastier to Outsiders

By Michal Bauer, Associate Professor of Economics, CERGE-EI and Charles University; Jana Cahlíková, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance; Dagmara Celik Katreniak, Assistant Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow; Julie Chytilová, Associate Professor of Economics, Charles University; Researcher, CERGE-EI; Lubomír Cingl, […]

Read More

Journey into a Libertarian Future: Part VI – Certainty

This post was first published on December 6, 2018 By Andrew Dittmer, who recently finished his PhD in mathematics at Harvard and is currently continuing work on his thesis topic. He also taught mathematics at a local elementary school. Andrew enjoys explaining the recent history of the financial sector to a popular audience. […]

Read More

Intergenerational Mobility in the US: One Size Doesn’t Fit All

By Juan C. Palomino, Research Officer, Institute for New Economic Thinking, University of Oxford; Gustavo A. Marrero, Professor of Economics and Director, Research Center of Social Inequality and Governance (CEDESOG), University of La Laguna; and Juan Gabriel Rodríguez, Professor of Economics, Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Originally published at VoxEU The […]

Read More